Events / News

November 2018

Congress Appropriation to NIH and NCI for FY 2019
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National Cancer Institute Budget Recommendation for FY 2020
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American Cancer Society - Cancer Facts & Figures 2018
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National Cancer Institute Budget Recommendation for FY 2019
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February 2017

American Cancer Society - Cancer Facts & Figures 2017
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December 13, 2016

21st Century Cures Act
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July 1, 2016

National Cancer Moonshot Initiative
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The President's Budget for Fiscal Year 2017
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October 30, 2015

National Cancer Insitute FY 2017 Annual Plan & Budget Proposal
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February 1, 2015

American Cancer Society Cancer Facts and Figures 2015
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January 30, 2015

Precision Medicine Initiative
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January 26, 2015

Accelerating Biomedical Research Act Introduced
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December 4, 2015

National Cancer Institute FY 2016 Plan and Budget Request
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February 1, 2014

ACS Cancer Facts and Figures 2014
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January 16, 2013

ACS Cancer Facts and Figures 2013
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January 7, 2013

NCI Report to the Nation on Status of Cancer
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January 2, 2013

NCI ByPass Budget FY2013
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August 20, 2012

AACR Cancer Progress Report 2012
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April 3, 2012

NCI Report: Senate Appropriations Hearing Highlights NCI's Provocative Questions Project
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July 27, 2011

NCI Director Harold Varmus Reviews First Year
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July 14, 2011

OVAC Urges Cancer Funding
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January 10, 2011

Cancer Research Funding Emphasis
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Events / News

November 2018

Congress Appropriation to NIH and NCI for FY 2019

The FY 2019 Department of Defense and Labor, Health and Human Services, and Education Appropriations Act, October 8, 2018, included $5.74 billion for the National Cancer Institute, a $79 million increase over FY 2018. NCI also received $400 million in FY 2019 for the Beau Biden Cancer Moonshot, which was authorized in the 21st Century Cures Act of 2016. www.cancer.gov

National Cancer Institute Budget Recommendation for FY 2020

The National Cancer Institute (NCI) on September 24, 2018, submitted its Annual Plan and Budget Proposal for FY 2020 to the President and Congress. The plan, which represents the NCI’s best professional judgement on the optimum funding needed to make the most rapid progress against cancer.

The plan includes focusing increased funding on several areas that will catalyze additional progress in cancer research and take advantage of the opportunities to defeat cancer. These areas include basic science for discovery of new approaches to cancer prevention, detection and treatment, adding to researcher capacity, increasing use of data to make faster progress against cancer, and fully realizing the power of clinical trials. The total scientific NCI professional judgment recommended appropriation to NCI for FY 2020 is $6.52 Billion. www.cancer.gov

American Cancer Society - Cancer Facts & Figures 2018

The American Cancer Society has published Cancer Facts and Figures 2018. The publication includes estimated numbers or new cancer cases, cancer survivors, incidence and progress in prevention and treatment, and cancer deaths in the United States in 2018. The publication includes other information on trends in cancer research, treatment, prevention and survival. www.cancer.gov

National Cancer Institute Budget Recommendation for FY 2019

The National Cancer Institute (NCI) on August 8, 2017 submitted its 2019 Budget Request and Recommendation to recommend to Congress to increase appropriations to the NCI for Fiscal Year 2019 to a grand total of $6.38 Billion, consisting of $5.98 Billion for research for understanding of mechanisms of cancer, detecting and diagnosing cancer, treating cancer, achieving public health, reducing cancer disparities, training and infrastructure and $400 Million for Cancer Moonshot funding. www.cancer.gov

February 2017

American Cancer Society - Cancer Facts & Figures 2017

The American Cancer Society has published Cancer Facts and Figures 2017. The publication includes estimated numbers or new cancer cases, and deaths from cancer in the United States in 2017. The publication includes other information on trends in cancer research, treatment, prevention and survival. It is available online at www.cancer.org/.../cancer-facts-statistics.

December 13, 2016

21st Century Cures Act

President Obama signed into law the 21st Century Cures Act on December 13, 2016. The Act will provide for accelerated research and treatment of cancer and implement recommendations of the Cancer Moonshot Initiative.

July 1, 2016

The President's Budget for Fiscal Year 2017

Budget of the United States Government, Fiscal Year 2017 contains the Budget Message of the President, information on the President’s priorities, budget overviews organized by agency, and summary tables.

An item in the President’s Budget for Fiscal Year 2017 about cancer research was: Supporting a Cancer Moonshot. During his 2016 State of the Union Address, President Obama called on Vice President Biden to lead a new, national “Moonshot” initiative to eliminate cancer as we know it. The Budget supports this effort with a $1 billion initiative to provide the funding necessary for researchers to accelerate the development of new cancer detection and treatments. This includes $195 million in new cancer activities at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) in Fiscal Year 2016, $755 million in mandatory funds in the 2017 Budget for new cancer-related research activities at both NIH and the Food and Drug Administration, and support from other agencies such as the Departments of Defense and Veterans Affairs.

National Cancer Institute FY 2017 Annual Plan and Budget Proposal

The National Cancer Institute (NCI) has submitted its Annual Plan and Budget Proposal for Fiscal Year 2017 to the President and published it for consideration by Congress and the public.

The NCI requests a funding increase of 7 percent over the FY 2016 funding allocation. The proposal also asks Congress to consider annual appropriation increases of 7 percent to the NCI over the next 10 years. The NCI proposal states that long-term commitment would provide it with the opportunity to make the most progress in cancer research.

The NCI is also publishing a series of posts on the online NCI Cancer Currents blog, in which NCI scientific leaders will discuss the research areas highlighted in the FY 2017 Annual Plan and Budget Proposal. These will describe how greater Congressional funding for NCI research can lead to dramatic gains in prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of cancer.

The NCI FY 2017 Annual Plan and Budget Proposal and related information is available online at www.cancer.gov

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October 30, 2015

National Cancer Institute FY 2017 Annual Plan and Budget Proposal

The National Cancer Institute (NCI) has submitted its Annual Plan and Budget Proposal for Fiscal Year 2017 to the President and published it for consideration by Congress and the public.

The NCI requests a funding increase of 7 percent over the FY 2016 funding allocation. The proposal also asks Congress to consider annual appropriation increases of 7 percent to the NCI over the next 10 years. The NCI proposal states that long-term commitment would provide it with the opportunity to make the most progress in cancer research.

The NCI is also publishing a series of posts on the online NCI Cancer Currents blog, in which NCI scientific leaders will discuss the research areas highlighted in the FY 2017 Annual Plan and Budget Proposal. These will describe how greater Congressional funding for NCI research can lead to dramatic gains in prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of cancer.

The NCI FY 2017 Annual Plan and Budget Proposal and related information is available online at www.cancer.gov


February 1, 2015

American Cancer Society Cancer Facts and Figures 2015

American Cancer Society has published Cancer Facts and Figures 2015, which is the most current report by ACS about cancer incidence, mortality and costs. The report is available online at www.cancer.org

January 30, 2015

Precision Medicine Initiative

The White House announced details of the Precision Medicine Initiative that is part of the President’s FY 2016 proposed budget sent to Congress. It is intended to study and develop prevention and treatment of cancer that takes into account individual differences in people’s genes, environments, and lifestyles. The initiative provides a $215 million investment for the National Institutes of Health (NIH), and National Cancer Institute (NCI) together with the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), and the Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology (ONC). A fact sheet on this Precision Medicine Initiative is online at www.whitehouse.gov/

January 26, 2015

Accelerating Biomedical Research Act Introduced

The Accelerating Biomedical Research Act, HR 531, was introduced in Congress as legislation that would restore the purchasing power of the National Institutes of Health (NIH)’s funding to what it would have been if it had kept up with inflation since 2003. The bill would allow appropriations to increase NIH funding by 10 percent for the first two years and about six percent each year thereafter through 2021. A coalition of over 100 advocacy groups and research institutions support the legislation. The bill text is available online at www. thomas.loc.gov/

December 4, 2014

National Cancer Institute FY 2016 Plan and Budget Request

The National Cancer Society published its professional judgment budget request to the President for Fiscal Year 2016. The announcement requested appropriation of $5.75 billion to the NCI for FY 2016. It stated that the NCI is poised to accelerate the rate of scientific discovery and reduce the burden of cancer in the United States and around the world. That will require strong and sustained funding for a wide range of research disciplines, including basic science to clinical science to research on implementation and cancer care delivery. The NCI's Annual Plan and Budget Proposal for Fiscal Year 2016 is available online at www.nci.gov/

February 1, 2014

American Cancer Society Cancer Facts and Figures 2014

American Cancer Society has published Cancer Facts and Figures 2014, which is the most current report by ACS about cancer incidence, mortality and costs. The report is available online at www.cancer.org


September 20, 2013

American Association for Cancer Research Report

The American Association for Cancer Research has released its AACR Cancer Progress Report 2013. The report urges policymakers intensify efforts in supporting cancer research and biomedical science, particularly in the present challenging fiscal times and with the recent enactment of sequestration. In addition to a call for prioritized funding for the National Institutes of Health (NIH), the report is to illustrate the transformation of research discoveries into improvements in cancer care, and highlights current challenges in cancer research. Available at www.aacr.org


January 16, 2013

American Cancer Society Cancer Facts and Figures 2013

American Cancer Society has published Cancer Facts and Figures 2013, which is the most current report by ACS about cancer incidence, mortality and costs. The report is available online at www.cancer.org


January 7, 2013

NCI Annual Report to the Nation on the Status of Cancer

The National Cancer Institute has published a comprehensive report on the progress of cancer research. The Annual Report to the Nation on the Status of Cancer, 1975–2009.shows that overall cancer death rates continued to decline in the United States among both men and women, among all major racial and ethnic groups, and for all of the most common cancer sites, including lung, colon and rectum, female breast, and prostate. However, the report also shows that death rates continued to increase during the latest time period for melanoma of the skin and for cancers of the liver, pancreas, and uterus. The report is co-authored by researchers from the American Cancer Society (ACS), the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the National Cancer Institute (NCI), and the North American Association of Central Cancer Registries (NAACCR). It appears early online in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute and will be published in print issue 3, volume 105.


January 2, 2013

NCI ByPass Budget FY 2013

The National Cancer Institute has published its budget proposal entitled The National Cancer Program Managing the Nation’s Research Portfolio -2013. This is the NCI budget proposal to the President for fiscal year 2013 furnished pursuant to the National Cancer Act o 1971. The professional budget requests appropriation of $5,833, 010,000 to the NCI for cancer research. The report describes progress in cancer research, new initiatives, including the NCI Provocative Questions Project . It describes the need for increased funding, and adverse effect of shrinking budgets since 2003. The opportunities for increased discovery are greater now than at any previous time, and greater funding is needed to capitalize on those to find more effective ways to prevent, control and cure cancer. The report is available online at www.cancer.gov/aboutnci/budget...2013/NCI_Plan_2013


August 20, 2012

AACR Cancer Progress Report 2012.

The American Association for Cancer Research has published a 2012 progress report on cancer research. The report includes a call to action asking U. S. citizens to urge their legislators to support cancer research and biomedical science and not let federal deficit sequestration cut NIH/NCI funding and thereby prevent continued rapid progress in cancer discoveries. www.cancerreport.org


April 3, 2012

NCI Report: Senate Appropriations Hearing Highlights NCI's Provocative Questions Project

The following information was published by the National Cancer Institute in NCI Cancer Bulletin, April 3, 2012 :

Senate appropriators commended NCI for the Provocative Questions Project (PQ) at a March 28 hearing before the Senate Appropriations Subcommittee on Labor, Health and Human Services, Education, and Related Agencies (Labor-HHS) considering the fiscal year 2013 NIH budget. NCI Director Dr. Harold Varmus joined NIH Director Dr. Francis Collins and several other NIH institute and center directors at the hearing.

The hearing showcased bipartisan support for NIH and the nation’s biomedical research enterprise while also recognizing current budget constraints. Senator Richard Shelby (R-AL) commented on the need for “out-of-the-box thinking” to address those constraints and recognized PQ as an important example, saying, “This project shows that there are innovative ways to energize the research community, even when budgets are constrained.” Dr. Varmus explained, “[PQ] is an initiative that solicited over 750 applications to study these deeper questions and empowered the scientific community to help us define what needs to be answered in the future.”

Subcommittee Chair Senator Tom Harkin (D-IA) asked Dr. Varmus to outline NCI’s strategies for continued progress during difficult fiscal times. Dr. Varmus identified a number of steps that NCI is taking. “We have been looking very carefully, for example, at grants that get lower priority scores that meet high-priority topics to make sure those get funded. We’ve been reorganizing our Clinical Trials Cooperative Groups to be sure they operate effectively and are answering deep scientific questions,” he said.

Senator Mark Pryor (D-AR), a clear cell sarcoma survivor, asked Dr. Varmus to speak about NCI’s pancreatic cancer research portfolio and efforts to prioritize this research. Dr. Varmus emphasized that pancreatic cancer research is a priority for the institute, saying, “We have a much larger number of investigators working on the disease, and we have scientific opportunities that are very dramatic. …As a result, over the course of the last decade, the amount of money NCI spends on this disease—despite a flattening of our budget—has gone up about 300 percent.” Dr. Varmus further described the NCI priority-review process for cancers that have seen less progress in treatment, citing as examples pancreatic, lung, and ovarian cancers, as well as glioblastoma. He also recognized the role of advocacy organizations in encouraging an increased focus on pancreatic cancer, particularly by providing incentives to NCI-supported investigators to pursue this challenging area of research.


July 27, 2011

NCI Director Harold Varmus Reviews First Year

National Cancer Institute Director Harold Varmus gave a “Town Hall” review of his first year of service at NCI, July 27, 2011. Dr. Varmus said the NCI needs to become better prepared to adapt to budget uncertainties. It will need to think about grants, perhaps moving some toward shorter durations with less money, which some would argue, encourage exploration and more innovative proposal. He said some awards to NCI's most outstanding investigators—both new and more experienced—could be extended to seven years to 10 years, to create a feeling of stability in the scientific community. He emphasized importance of training programs, particularly to improve the quality and number of people who come to work at NCI. Additional information on this presentation is at www.nci.gov


July 14, 2011

OVAC Urges Congress to Maintain Cancer Funding

One Voice Against Cancer (OVAC), a coalition of more than public interest groups representing millions of cancer researchers, patients, survivors and their families throughout the nation, has urged US House of Representatives appropriations leadership to continue to make funding for cancer research at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) a priority in the FY 2012 Labor-HHS- Education appropriations bill. OVAC stated that cuts to funding for ongoing cancer research programs would squander the progress made during the past few years and cause lasting harm to cancer patients and their families. OVAC’s letter is a www.ovaconline.org


January 10, 2011

Cancer Research Funding Emphasis

National Cancer Institute (NCI) Director Dr. Harold Varmus outlined priority areas for NCI investment and provided a status report initiatives at an NCI “town hall” meeting, January 10, 2011. Dr. Varmus indicated three areas will have priority for cancer funding at the NCI. The first: awarding roughly the same number of new research project grants in 2011 as were awarded in 2010 (approximately 1,250), with priority given to young and first-time researchers, especially grants to new investigators, considered as the single best means to pursue new ideas. Also priorities are maintaining robust funding for genomics-based research credited with delivering discoveries in all areas of cancer research; and streamlining cancer clinical trials, to include reducing the number of adult clinical trials cooperative groups from nine to no more than four groups, and increasing reimbursement to clinicians for participating in phase II and phase III clinical trials.


December 20, 2010

NCI Provocative Questions Project

The National Cancer Institute has initiated a Provocative Questions project intended to assemble a list of important but non-obvious questions that will stimulate the NCI’s research communities to use laboratory, clinical, and population sciences in especially effective and imaginative ways. The questions are to:(1) build on specific advances in our understanding of cancer and cancer control; (2) address broad issues in the biology of cancer that have proven difficult to resolve; (3) take into consideration the likelihood of progress in the foreseeable future (e.g. 5 to 10 years); and (4) address ways to overcome obstacles to achieving long-term goals. The collaborative process of formulating the “provocative questions” should engage the NCI’s scientific community in serious debate and energize the NCI’s many constituencies (advocacy groups, health professionals, Members of Congress, and others) about the prospects for improving the welfare of cancer patients through research. These other constituencies are encouraged to take part in the Provocative Questions project through discussions and activities on the NCI website provocativequestions.nci.nih.gov/. The new leaders at the NCI have announced that they are eager to influence the state of cancer research by attempting to define more potentially “game- changing scientific questions” that could influence the directions taken by NCI-sponsored research in the future.


September 1, 2010

President's Cancer Panel Study; The Future of Cancer Research; Accelerating Scientific Innovation.

The President's Cancer Panel has announced a four meeting series to consider and evaluate 40 years of cancer research since enactment of the National Cancer Act of 1971 which created the National Cancer Program. The study and series, entitled The Future of Cancer of Cancer Research: Accelerating Scientific Innovation, will be held in four meetings from Sept. 22, 2010, through February 1, 2011. The meetings are expected to have participation that will include health care experts, scientists, government representatives, cancer organization representatives and advocates. The President's Cancer Panel will conduct the meetings to take stock of the progress in cancer research and to explore potential future enhancements of the National Cancer Program. It plans to explore questions concerning how cancer research has changed in the past 40 years, and what is the vision of the course of cancer research in the next 15 years. It will also consider how transformative change can be promoted within the National Cancer Program, and barriers (e.g. money, workforce/training issues) that must be overcome to advance cancer research.

Contact information on this program is: Jennifer Burt, MPH, Special Assistant, President's Cancer Panel, 301-451-9399, burtj@mail.nih.; gov.http://pcp.cancer.gov


June 1, 2010

President's Cancer Panel Issues Report on Environmental Cancer Risk

In May 2010, the President's Cancer Panel issued a report titled "Reducing Environmental Cancer Risk: What We Can Do Now." The report summarizes the Panel's findings from a series of meetings and the input from more than 40 experts. The report recommends changing to a precautionary, prevention-oriented approach instead of the current reactionary approaches to environmental contaminants in which human harm must be proven before action is taken to reduce or eliminate exposure. The report recommended changing cancer research and policy agendas concerning environmental causes. The report can be found the President's Cancer Panel website www.pcp.cancer.gov


May 17, 2010

President Obama to Appoint Harold Varmus, M.D., to Lead the National Cancer Institute

Today, President Barack Obama announced his intent to appoint Harold Varmus, M.D., to serve as Director of the National Cancer Institute (NCI).

In an e-mail to the NCI staff, Francis Collins, M.D., Ph.D., Director of the National Institutes of Health, said that Varmus "brings unmatched expertise at all levels - not only in cutting edge scientific research, but also as a leader in the development of strategies for improving patient care, in scientific education and training, and in the design of novel public-private partnerships." He also stated, "I want to express my appreciation to John Niederhuber, M.D., for his dedicated service and fine leadership of NCI over these past years."

Biography of Dr. Varmus

Dr. Varmus, a former Director of the National Institutes of Health (NIH), co-recipient of the 1989 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine for studies of the genetic basis of cancer, and recent co-chair of President Obama's Council of Advisors on Science and Technology (PCAST), has served as the President of Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center (MSKCC) in New York City since January 2000. His research career began as a member of the U.S. Public Health Service at the NIH and as a post-doctoral fellow at the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF). He then served as a member of the UCSF medical faculty for over twenty years, conducting scientific work on cancer genes and retroviruses. In 1993, President Clinton appointed Varmus to become Director of the NIH, where he guided construction of a new clinical center, strengthened the intramural research program, recruited outstanding leaders, and helped to initiate a doubling of the NIH budget. At MSKCC, Varmus has united clinical care and laboratory activities, expanded faculty and facilities, developed inter-institutional research programs, led a two billion dollar capital campaign, and started a new graduate school in cancer biology. He recently co-chaired an Institute of Medicine report on The U.S. Commitment to Global Health; is a co-founder and Chairman of the Board of the Public Library of Science, a publisher of open access journals; and chairs the Global Health Advisory Committee at the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation. He has been a member of the U.S. National Academy of Sciences since 1984 and of the Institute of Medicine since 1991, and he has received the National Medal of Science and the Vannevar Bush Award. Varmus majored in English literature at Amherst College, earned a master's degree in English at Harvard University, received his medical degree from Columbia University's College of Physicians and Surgeons, and was trained in internal medicine at Columbia-Presbyterian Medical Center.


May 1, 2010

One Voice Against Cancer - FY 2011 Appropriations Requests

One Voice Against Cancer (OVAC), a broad coalition of cancer-related organizations representing millions ofAmericans, works in support of federally funded programs that engage in the fight against cancer, and will work to ensure that the Administration and Congress make funding for cancer research and related programs a priority in fiscal year (FY) 2011.

Continuation of the support provided through the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act and FY 2010 Consolidated Appropriations Act is critical to achieving long-term success at reducing overall cancer incidence and mortality. Thanks to these recent investments, our nation is well positioned to carry out the President's charge of having a national cancer program that will "have the greatest impact on developing innovative diagnostics, treatments, and cures for cancer." These recent investments have created dramatic new opportunities in research, spurring innovation in areas such as genetics and personalized medicine that will yield long-term economic benefits. Beyond the economic value, these investments are improving the quality of life for millions of Americans. Continuation of this research will support the development of new and improved preventive, detection, and therapeutic tools for all forms of cancer, something that is especially important for the high mortality cancers for which we have yet to see significant progress. It is therefore critical that the nation's cancer research investment not be cut. Federal support for research must be sustained at a level that will allow progress to continue. To provide sustainable and predictable funding for the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and the National Cancer Institute (NCI), OVAC is requesting that the NIH receive $35.2 billion in FY 2011, which would provide NCI with $5.79billion.

It is also important to note that at least half of all cancer deaths last year could have been detected early and aggressively treated, or prevented altogether simply by using the knowledge and tools that are already available to us today. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) cancer prevention and control programs provide vital resources to every state for cancer monitoring and surveillance, screening programs, tobacco cessation, state cancer control planning and implementation, and awareness initiatives targeting skin, prostate, colon, ovarian, and blood cancers. Enhanced funding for the CDC in FY 2011 will ensure that a half-million women are screened for breast cancer, tens of thousands of men and women have access to colorectal screening, and provide greater support for state and local awareness and education programs.

Oncology nurses are on the front-lines of the provision of quality cancer care and contribute significantly to cancer research. In order to address the current and future nursing workforce shortage, additional funding to federal nursing workforce development programs to ensure enough resources to fund a higher rate of nursing scholarships and loan repayment applications and to support other essential endeavors to sustain and boost our nation's nursing workforce.

Finally, OVAC recognizes the importance of additional funding for the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to finance critical safety programs, open new foreign offices, upgrade laboratories, scientific expertise and information technology systems, as well as hire more inspectors. A strong FDA is needed to deliver safe and effective therapies to market. The member organizations recognize the critical role that the FDA serves as thenexus between new scientific discoveries and routine cancer care.

For FY 2011, OVAC will urge the Administration and Congress to support the following funding recommendations:

National Institutes of Health (NIH) $35.2 billion ($4.2 billion (13.5%) over FY 2010)

National Cancer Institute (NCI) $5.79 billion ($691 million (13.5%) over FY 2010)

National Center on Minority Health and Health Disparities (NCMHD) $240 million ($29 million (13.5%) over FY 2010)

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Division of Cancer Prevention and Control (CDC) $601million ($126 million (26%) over FY 2010)

  • National Comprehensive Cancer Control Program: $50 million ($29 million over FY 2010)
  • National Program of Cancer Registries: $65 million ($14 million over FY 2010)
  • National Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection Program: $255 million($40 million over FY 2010)
  • Colorectal Cancer Screening, Education & Outreach Initiative: $50 million ($5 million over FY 2010)

National Skin Cancer Prevention Education Program: $5 million ($3 million over FY 2010)

  • Prostate Cancer Awareness Campaign: $25 million ($11 million over FY 2010)
  • Ovarian Cancer Control Initiative: $10 million ($4 million over FY 2010)
  • Geraldine Ferraro Blood Cancer Program: $6 million ($1.3 million over FY 2010)
  • Gynecologic Cancer and Education and Awareness (Johanna's Law): $10 million ($3 million over FY 2010)
  • Office of Smoking and Health: $125 million ($14 million over FY 2010)

Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA)

  • Patient Navigator Program: $18.6 million
  • Title VIII Nursing Programs: TBD

Food and Drug Admin istration (FDA) $2.857 billion ($500 million (21%) over FY 2010)

Department of Health and Human Services Office of the Secretary

  • Childhood Cancer Research and Awareness: $30 million

Groups Signed on to the OVAC FY 2011 Appropriations Request

  • Alliance for Prostate Cancer Prevention
  • American Academy of Dermatology Association
  • American Association for Cancer Research
  • American Cancer Society Cancer Action Network
  • American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists
  • American Society for Radiation Oncology
  • Asian & Pacific Islander American Health Forum
  • Association of American Cancer Institutes
  • Bladder Cancer Action Network
  • C3: Colorectal Cancer Coalition
  • Charlene Miers Foundation for Cancer Research
  • Colon Cancer Alliance
  • CureSearch National Childhood Cancer Foundation
  • Friends of Cancer Research
  • Intercultural Cancer Council Caucus
  • International Myeloma Foundation
  • Lance Armstrong Foundation
  • Leukemia & Lymphoma Society
  • Malecare Prostate Cancer Support
  • Melanoma Research Foundation
  • Men's Health Network
  • National Alliance for Hispanic Health
  • National Alliance of State Prostate Cancer Coalitions
  • National Cervical Cancer Coalition/HPV Cancer Coalition
  • National Coalition for Cancer Research (NCCR)
  • National Patient Advocate Foundation
  • Nevada Cancer Institute
  • Ovarian Cancer National Alliance
  • Pancreatic Cancer Action Network
  • Pennsylvania Prostate Cancer Coalition
  • Prevent Cancer Foundation
  • Sarcoma Foundation of America
  • Society of Gynecologic Oncologists
  • Susan G. Komen for the Cure Advocacy Alliance
  • Us TOO International Prostate Cancer Education and Support Network
  • ZERO- The Project to End Prostate Cancer

April 15, 2010

Institute of Medicine Report on Clinical Trials for Cancer

A special Institute of Medicine (IOM) committee has recommended substantial restructuring and increased funding of The National Cancer Institute's (NCI) Clinical Trials Cooperative Group Program in a report issued April 15 titled A National Cancer Clinical Trials System for the 21st Century: Reinvigorating the NCI Cooperative Group Program.

The IOM committee's report and analysis, which was requested by NCI Director Dr. John E. Niederhuber, lauded the cooperative groups' substantial contributions in past years to landmark research for improving cancer care. However, Dr. John Mendelsohn, IOM committee chairman and president of the University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center, also cautioned that "the NCI Cooperative Group Program is falling short of its full potential to improve the quality of care that cancer patients receive. An accumulation of problems is hampering progress just at a time when new knowledge about the genetic and molecular underpinnings of cancer has created opportunities for designing trials with new, targeted anticancer agents."

The IOM committee issued recommendations based on four broad goals for improving the cooperative group clinical trials process:

  • Improve the efficiency and reduce average time for the design and launch of innovative clinical trials by con-solidating functions, committees, and cooperative groups; streamlining oversight processes; facilitating collaboration; and streamlining and stan-dardizing data collection and analysis.
  • Incorporate innovation in science and trial design, for example, in studies identifying biomarkers that can predict therapeutic response.
  • Adequately support those clinical trials that have the greatest possibility of improving survival and the quality of life for cancer patients, and increase the rate of clinical trial completion and publication.
  • Incentivize the participation of patients and physicians in clinical trials by providing adequate funds to cover the costs of research by reimbursing the costs of standard patient care during the trial.

In an independent survey of NCI cooperative group members, conducted by the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) and published in the May issue of the Journal of Oncology Practice, 33 percent of respondents were planning to limit their participation in NCI-funded cooperative trials and another 9 percent were considering limiting participation. A majority (75 percent) of these cooperative group respondents cited inadequate NCI reimbursement as the reason for limiting involvement in such studies. NCI's per-patient case reimbursement of $2,000 for cooperative group studies has not changed in 10 years and falls short of the estimated $5,000 to $6,000 typically spent per patient enrolled, the ASCO authors wrote.

Dr. Mendelsohn noted that the IOM committee also endorsed the recommendations recently made by NCI's Operational Efficiency Working Group (OEWG), which aim to achieve similar goals for improving the cooperative group program and cancer clinical trials in general. Those recommendations were highlighted by Dr. James H. Doroshow, director of NCI's Division of Cancer Treatment and Diagnosis in an April 6 Guest Director's Update for the NCI Cancer Bulletin.

Responding to the IOM report's release, Dr. Doroshow expressed thanks to the IOM committee for their efforts and "complete endorsement" of the OEWG report. "We will carefully review the IOM report and equally carefully consider how we will follow up on its recommendations," he added. "Our hope is that this report will complement NCI's ongoing efforts to improve the clinical trials system, as we continue working to implement the recommendations of our Clinical Trials Working Group's 2005 report."

The IOM report helps "reinforce the notion that in an era of molecular oncology the clinical trials process must change," Dr. Doroshow added. "The costs - in dollars and time - to bring a new drug to market are unsustainable. Moreover, cancer clinical trials of the future will require the testing of multiple agents against multiple disease targets. Creating a cancer clinical trials system capable of testing multiple hypotheses faster, with less cost and greater efficiency, is and must remain one of NCI's highest priorities."

Source: The National Cancer Institute